Author Topic: Rust on Infared grates  (Read 7665 times)

jef990

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Rust on Infared grates
« on: 05/27/10 22:41:52 »
I have read a few comments about rust on the grills, both stainless and porcilan. I just got a new urban infared and seasoned it with "PAM CANOLA SPRAY"
a few times before I cooked for the first time and  it looked like rust on the grill after a day. Wow.this cannot be. I took some olive oil on a paper towel and wiped it down. The "rust" came off in flakes, but was able to remove. I think the poplent in the pam is the problem. As I have used bottled canola since without the same outcome. Just thought this might be helpful to users and yourself
John F.

deestafford

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #1 on: 05/27/10 22:55:41 »
John F., Thanks for the info.  I use PAM spray and what you say is true. It wasn't flakes but just rust looking.  I have not tried with canola and the paper towel.  Well actually I have and didn't pay any attention.  I just went ahead and went on with the cooking.  ;) Dee
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Johnny

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #2 on: 05/28/10 07:10:43 »
Jeff and Dee,  yesterday I went out to cook on mine and I think I saw that you saw.  Real thin, brittle pieces of dark rust-like material on the grates and in the trough.  If you take out your grates (when cold!) and give them a good look-see, you might find them to be perfectly fine.  What it might be is PAM or oil that you used got baked on and then released when the grill cooled off. 

I haven't tried the PAM route but I have wiped down the grates before putting stuff on the grill (which is why I think I got the 'rust flakes').  I'm still trying to find a good method to keep stuff from sticking.  I'm half tempted to ask CharBroil to make a set of uncoated cast iron replacement grates for the RED.  I'd buy them in an instant.  I have to say once the grates on my Commercial were seasoned, they were great to work with!
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tnjimbob

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #3 on: 05/28/10 09:42:12 »
I believe this is your problem with PAM spray. Grain alcohol is listed as the 2nd ingredient, which may be causing rust as it dries. If you spray it on the grates, it may be better to spray it on and then turn on the burners for a minute or two to set it and evaporate the alcohol.



You could purchase an oil mister & spray your own canola onto the grates. Might be easier than using a paper towel to spread canola oil.

deestafford

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #4 on: 05/28/10 10:26:28 »
Tnjimbob,  If I don't use Pam and use a mister that doesn't contain alcohol, how am I going to get all that smoke, smell, and increased fire under the IR emitter that I now get?  ??? Dee
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tnjimbob

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #5 on: 05/28/10 15:56:44 »
Not sure Dee, all I know is I like my eyebrows intact. I'll stick with the oil mister or use paper towels & canola to wipe down my grates.

Thankee.

Diablo

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #6 on: 05/29/10 15:36:01 »
Seasoning Your Grates - Just like mamas cast iron skillet, the stainless steel Quantum® Cooking System will need to be seasoned prior to use. This is most important as it will optimize cooking performance. :D In addition, it will make cleaning easier :D and inhibit rusting. :D Coat all surfaces of the Quantum® Cooking System (Grates and Emitter plate) with vegetable oil. If you use a spray, which is easier to use, wipe down the Quantum® Cooking System after spraying to ensure an even coat. Start your grill and let it burn for 15 minutes – or until the vegetable oil burns off and stops smoking. The shiny finish on grates and emitter should now have a very dark brown or bronze color.

Your grill is now seasoned and you are ready to cook. The more you use your Quantum® grill the better it will cook. The darker - more seasoned - the cooking chamber becomes the hotter and the more evenly it will cook. A light coat of vegetable oil after each use (once the grill has cooled) will keep the surfaces seasoned and help prevent any rusting – again, just like grandma’s cast iron skillet. The next time you grill go ahead and wipe the grilling surface with a well oiled cloth prior to starting your grill. This should remove any debris that may have accumulated and will help prevent your grilled foods from sticking to the cooking surface. You are now ready to pre-heat your grill and start grilling.

So, the three basic steps are:
1- Make sure to season your grill prior to the first use. Coat all cooking surfaces with olive or vegetable oil. This can be done with a spray or well coated rag. Heat the grill for 15-30 minutes until there is no more smoke.

2- After your grill has cooled again wipe down or spray the entire cooking surface. This will coat the metal and provide a barrier to help reduce surface rust.

3- Prior to cooking again wipe down with an oiled rag. This will remove any debris/rust that may have accumulated


this is just to clear up any confusion if anyone is new to the convo or cares to read

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i do NOt represent Char-Broil

im just trying to help out sry  dont band me
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jon

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #7 on: 06/14/10 00:16:45 »
If you use Pam, make sure it is the one that says high teperature Pam for grilling. I just checked mine and it does not have grain alcohol, and it works great...
Jon

seattlegriller

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #8 on: 03/22/11 20:21:37 »
New guy here... I just bought my 2-burner grill, Urban I think (Costco version: Model #463262911) this weekend and used it for the first time tonight.  I had a bottle of Pam High Heat also in my pantry and decided to use that as it's mostly Canola Oil. 

However, I was freaking out after I turned on the grill after spraying it and about 20 minutes later I had "black flakes" for a lack of a better term all over my grill and epically in the hottest spots.  At first I thought that the grill grates (which are stainless steel) had some type of factory oil on it or something as the instructions booklet says it's good to burn off oils and the like before the first use. 

Well I was happy the flakes rubbed off easily once the grates cooled but it made a big mess as they blew all over the place.  However I repeated the processes a few hours later and the same thing happened.  I looked everywhere online trying to find out what was happening because it was too late to call Char-Broil.  I saw this thread and was glad to find this.

I do believe it's the Pam spray as others have mentioned and nothing else like rust.  There is something or some chemical in the spray that makes it dry and flake rather than just burn off.  I only used Pam High Heat: there is also Pam Original and Pam Grill which I don't have.

So when I finally got to making dinner (steaks) tonight I decided to only use Canola oil and that seemed better but I think there still is some residual residue left from the Pam spray that still is flaking.  I guess time will tell.

I have some other questions about my grill but will post it elsewhere.  Anyway my two cents...

deestafford

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #9 on: 03/22/11 20:49:31 »
Seattlegriller, Sorry bout your problems.  PAM can cause those black flakes when itis sprayed on very hot grill.  I've got where I do my steaks with no oil.  I just use salt, pepper, and sometimes a little garlic powder.  When you put meat on the IR grill, when it is ready it will come loose from the grates.  If you try to lift it and it's sticking...leave it there it is hot ready to release yet.  You get better grill marks with no oil or any moisture on the meat.  I don't know how you like your steaks but most of the folks here like their's med rare. I like mine closer to med. You need a good thermomter to get you cooks right because you want to cook to temp and not time. Read the threads on thermometers under the home section to get some good ideas on therms.  You'll find out that cooking with IR is completely different than cooking with wood,  charcoal or reg gas.  You'll eventually get the hang of it and your GF will think you are the Emeril of the grilling world of Seattle.  Speaking of Seattle, our fearless leader, "CB" Martin lives in Seattle.  Actually, he recently move to some upscale hippie island there.  He should be along soon and chiming in to help you.  Welcome.  We are here to make each cook better than your lasst one.  Dee
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seattlegriller

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #10 on: 03/22/11 21:05:49 »
deestafford - thanks for the tips.  I read a lot about the IR grills before I bought so I knew about the warnings of quick cook times...and that turned out to be true.  I watched my steaks like a hawk and checked them more than i normally would.  They turned out great...maybe I'll post a pic or two. 

Anyway I do have a digital probe thermometer but wasn't sure if it could handle the high heat under the hood...I'll look into that.  I also want to get the rotisserie for my grill, always wanted one of those.  Any tips on those or where to get one for the best price would be appreciated. 

For now on I will only coat my grill lightly with Canola oil in a spray bottle.  Think I'll get one that I can pump so that it mists and coats the grates better. 

I think I know which island(s) you're talking about...have a few co-workers that live there.  ;D

Barry

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #11 on: 03/22/11 21:14:57 »
Clean dry grates

spritz the meat, not the grates - if the grates are over 450F degrees and most oil has a smoke point below that - the oil turns to smoke (or in heavy doses to black coatings) and doesn't do anything. a light spritz of neutral flavor high temp oil on the meat doesn't make 'em slippery, it helps even the conduction of heat between grate and meat so it cooks semi-uniformly. When the proteins in the meat are properly "seared" (turn brown due to the Maillard effect - just like mom browning a roast in the skillet before roasting it) the meat will release.  This is pretty much true for all flesh, but not skin. For instance chicken skin needs to be grilled at a bit lower temp than you would the flesh of a boneless chicken breast or a beef steak - because it will scorch and get all blackened where the grates touch. You want brown, not black.

For this same reason I recommend you wipe off excess marinade before grilling. The marinade is intended to flavor enhance the interior of the meat - that's why you left it in there so long - but if you grill the meat "wet" with marinade it will steam, not sear or grill. And if there are sugars in the marinade they will burn at the 450F degrees or higher temps you want at grates to sear --- so you are defeating your purposes.

And for the trifecta - I also suggest removing excess rub after seasoning overnight before grilling - unless you prefer the flavor of the grilled semi-burnt spices in the rub.  Rub kinda sets up a marinade on the outside of the steak that works it's way in.  When cooking a roast or ribs, etc. the rub can remain because you aren't cooking at high temps over direct heat.  But when grilling - think of the meat and then consider adding flavor at the end as a glaze or finishing sauce.

OF course - the absolute rule of thumb is: "If you like it - then the way you do it is perfectly A-OK!"
« Last Edit: 03/22/11 21:30:56 by Barry "CB" Martin »

seattlegriller

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #12 on: 03/22/11 21:21:45 »
CB - I should have said I sprayed my grates when the grill was cold before I started her up, not when she was hot.  I did just spritz the steak before cooking as recomended.  The problem I believe was the PAM spray was flaking off as described above. 

It was such a nice day to grill (for Seattle anyway), what a great way to start off Spring... a new grill and seared meat!!!

Barry

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #13 on: 03/22/11 21:23:56 »
It was a lovely day today!  I'm just across the sound from you in Winslow.

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Re: Rust on Infared grates
« Reply #14 on: 03/22/11 21:24:18 »
Clean dry grates - spritz the meat, not the grates